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4 Blog Posts: Week 2

3 min read

1. Project

This week, I'm going to start my Ignite Talk! It seems a litle anxiety inducing because the slides change, but I'm excited to start it. I'm going to go into the history of my family, the history of the recipe, the history of the foods I'm writing about, hopefully all will go well! I also sent out my survey over break and got 9 responses!

2. Project

I've been thinking more about the video pathway a little bit more and do not think an interview is feasible anymore because my nonna splits her time at my house and my aunt's house, where she is this week. So, I think I'm going to make little recipe zines instead. Part of my survey asked if my family would like a book of my nonna's recipes, and 100% said yes. For the video, I will now film myself making the zines :)

3. Reading: When Learning and Assessment Diverge

 - " A student is not just a data point" - so important

- The author categorizes tests: "Many standardized tests are what I will call “target assessments”. Target assessments tell us how many people out of a designated population have hit a certain target, for example how many can compute fractions at a certain level of correctness." Some target assessments just tell us how many people can hit the target and leave it at that. Let’s call these “cognitively superficial target assessments”. Other target assessments tell us how many people not only can hit the target, but understand what the target (e.g., fractions) means and why it works as it does. Let’s call these sorts of assessments “cognitively deep target assessments”.

- "Too often in schools, we take reading as the main form of experience necessary for learning"

This is so for good Darwinian reasons: we survive by using the past to move to the future, not by lingering in the past. It is time, I think, for assessment and testing to move into the future, as well.

4. Anything Post - Southern Celebrates Student Leaders

  - I was invited to a student leadership appreciation day at Southern! Since I'm the treasurer of Italianissimi, I got to go. There were free t shirts (always a must) and they had donuts and hot chocolate, and a snack bar to show appreciation for the hard work their student leaders like myself do. It was really fun!

 

4 Blog Posts: Week 1

3 min read

1. Project Beginnings

At first I was so clueless about what I wanted my Do Something project to be, until Dr. McVerry suggested recipes. I knew my nonna had a ton of old recipes, but they're quite tattered and completely not in English. I thought it would be a fun challenge to translate these recipes for my project!

 

2. Developing My Ideas

I thought about the project a little bit more and chose the video option for my pathway. Since Thanksgiving break is coming up, I could interview my nonna when I'm home.

 

3. Reading - Rhizomatic Education

       - Knowledge as negotiation is not an entirely new concept in educational circles

        - A rhizomatic plant has no center and no defined boundary; rather, it is made up of a number of semi-independent nodes, each of which is capable of growing and spreading on its own, bounded only by the limits of its habitat (Cormier 2008). In the rhizomatic view, knowledge can only be negotiated, and the contextual, collaborative learning experience shared by constructivist and connectivist pedagogies is a social as well as a personal knowledge-creation process with mutable goals and constantly negotiated premises.

      - I interpreted this as learning has no boundaries, we can learn about anything we choose to - perhaps this is the negotiation Dave speaks of

    - New technologies force us to reexamine knowledge and how we learn as a society

  - Information is now more accessbile because of the internet, and there is NO BOUNDARY to what we can learn!

 

4. Badges?

    -  The focus on badges and alternative credentials is like trying to facilitate global trade by inventing Esperanto 

   - The premise behind all of the badge and alternative credential projects is the same: that if only there were a new, unified way to quantify, describe and give evidence of student learning inside the classroom and out, employers would be able to appropriately value those skills and illuminate a path to job outcomes - the author compares this to a utopia, an "idealized" solution to transform society

 - Compares these online badges to Girl Scout/Boy Scout patches, earning something for something you do that tells the world: "hey! I know a skill!"

- Unlike the author, I actually like the idea of online badges! I have a couple on yelp - he seems to allude this in his article when he mentions certain apps having a badge system.

Backstage Post #3

1 min read

I finished getting my supplies and borrowed my sister's tripod, so I found a space in my dorm building and filmed my video. It only took about an hour, so exporting it to iMovie and editing it shouldn't be a problem from here. 

Backstage Post #2

1 min read

Translating the recipe was harder than I thougt it would be. Even though I can understand Italian, I had a hard time reading her actual handwriting, especially because the picture was a little grainy. 

Backstage Post #1

1 min read

Before I actually make the zine, I'm going to get some construction paper. I already have scissors and markers - the last thing I need for the zine is the paper and I can now get started!

Backstage Post 3

Backstage Post 3

This picture shows the apple pie almost all put together.